Delighted

The food sector appears to be bursting at the seams with great ideas, but such concepts seldom have distinct flavors. Makenzie Marzluff is a culinary visionary with a strong sense of entrepreneurship. While watching programs on The Food Network in her teens, she fantasized about opening her own restaurant. She studied nutrition as a child and went on to start many enterprises, including a nutrition consulting firm, a Pilates class, and a smoothie bar. She learned what worked and what didn’t in running a company, as well as how to stand out in a crowded market.

Mackenzie wanted to serve a healthy cookie dough dip to guests at a party in 2014. She made the first dessert hummus by blending chickpeas with “improved” sweet components (coconut milk, organic sugar, and pure vanilla essence). After a year of developing varieties including brownie batter, snickerdoodle, orange-ginger, and oatmeal raisin, Marzluff found she was the only one making hummus that tasted like hers. She and her partner worked hard to get a $10,000 loan and established their business, selling at local farmers’ markets.

Enters The Shark Tank With Delighted Excitement

Season 9 Episode 4 of Shark Tank

Makenzie Marzluff entered the Shark Tank stage and introduced herself as a Los Angeles-based entrepreneur. Her speech started with a question about if the Sharks all had a sweet taste that needed to be fulfilled. When most individuals go grocery shopping, they pass by aisles filled with sugary treats. Because the temptation is too high, something from those aisles usually finds up in the cart.

Makenzie’s dessert hummus was offered as a guilt-free dessert option. With just 5g of sugar per serving, 100 percent non-GMO, gluten-free, and vegan, Delighted By Hummus is guilt-free. The Sharks happily accepted the invitation to “dig in and be delighted” with four distinct samples: brownie batter hummus on pretzels, snickerdoodle hummus on apple slices, vanilla bean hummus on graham crackers, and choco-mint hummus on a cupcake.

What’s the end result? The Sharks were clearly sold on the flavor.

The figures for Delighted By were even more amazing. It’s famously difficult to succeed in the refrigerated department of supermarkets. Marzluff was able to reach $1 million in gross revenue only 13 months after starting her company, thanks to pure persistence. She leased a van and drove her goods to every Wegman’s shop on the East Coast, sleeping on hummus coolers along the route. Her product was now available at 1200 locations. Marzluff asked the Sharks for $600,000 in return for a 12 percent stake in her Delighted By.

Mackenzie informed Alex that she had personally put in $20,000 and raised $400,000 from friends and family when asked how much she had invested so far. Her company was valued at $4 million following the first round of funding. She also said that her sales target was $1.5 million. Kevin was concerned that other major companies would swiftly copy her items and sell them as their own. Despite this, he recognized the potential and provided a $600,000 loan at 11% APR with 6% equity.

Alex said that he would be willing to spend 5 to 10 times net profits in a firm like hers. He wasn’t willing to make a deal since she was asking for more than 30 times that.

Mark speculated that the hummus could be too tough to sell in supermarkets. He asked Marzluff if she would be interested in selling her product in a more creative context, such as an ice cream parlor, where people could actively sample it. He didn’t perceive her as a rival to other brands and kinds of hummus. Despite this, her goods were offered alongside regular hummus in the stores. Kevin felt the concept of an ice cream business that served hummus was absurd. Barbara agreed that it was a poor decision. Mark, on the other hand, loved the label of craziness; after all, the craziest company entrepreneurs in his profession were the ones who earned him the most money.

Marzluff was also questioned about what she believed was lacking from a squad and how she would spend the money if she accepted the Sharks’ offer. Mackenzie informed him that she would take advantage of an offer of operational assistance. She would take brokers’ advice and use some of the funds to employ a vice president of sales.

Barbara predicted that Marzluff would have trouble forming connections and recruiting the proper individuals. Barbara had ruled Mackenzie out since she didn’t think delegating was her strong suit.

Mark offered $600,000 in return for a quarter-share in the company, as long as certain criteria were met. Mackenzie questioned whether he was confident in their ability to grow an $80 million firm, and he responded yes.

Mackenzie accepted Mark’s offer to help establish a terrific business based on the existing brilliant product after much deliberation. She left Shark Tank with the aim of her dessert hummus being a regular feature at home gatherings.

Delighted’s Life By The End Of Shark Tank

Delighted

Mackenzie’s firm grew significantly almost overnight. Her product’s awareness and education virtually doubled. She had to recruit a bigger crew to keep up with the increasing orders and interest.

Delighted By surpassed $5 million in sales in its second year of operation, and all flavors have been certified Kosher.

According to a Business 2 Community interview, she is also seeking additional merchants interested in carrying her spreadable dessert. What is her objective? Delighted By Hummus is available all throughout the country.

Mackenzie seemed to be working hard on her national goal today. Her goods are no longer only available at Wegmans. Delighted By items are now available at major shops such as Acme, Walmart, Target, Good Foods Grocery, Publix, and others. Her ambition to create the first national dessert hummus has come true.

Disclaimer: This post is for informative purposes only; Royal Pitch is not linked with Delighted By Hummus, Shark Tank, or any of its subsidiaries.

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